Just recently I joined a team. We write intranet web application. There is nothing too special about it, except that it was designed to be implemented as micro-services and as de-facto at the moment it is a classical single .NET MVC application. This happened for a simple reason: meeting first release deadline.

The design was reflected in how source control was set up: one git repository per each service. Unfortunately this caused a number of required maneuvers to be in synch and to push changes as team was making scattering changes in multiple repositories. This also made it more difficult to consolidate NuGet packages and other dependencies as all of them were in different repositories.

I think that microservices and corresponding hard reflection of their boundaries in form of source code repositories should evolve naturally. Starting with a single repository sounds more reasonable. If you keep the idea of microservices in you head and nicely decouple your code nothing stops you creating new repositories as you service boundaries start to make shape.

Taking this into account we merged repositories into one. There was only question of keeping source code history. Turns out the history can be easily preserved by employing git subtree command and placing all of the service repositories as subdirectories of a new single repository.

As a result, team is working much more effectively as we do not waste time on routine synch and checking who did what where. 

Conclusion: Theoretically micro-services should be implemented in their own repositories. That’s true, but in practice for relatively small and new project, with only one team working on it, single repository wins.

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